Reloading Podcast 233 - pop goes the pin

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are answering more questions.

  1. Ernie posted in Reloading Podcast Group: Which universal decapper are you guys using besides the lee?
    .
    Kind of annoyed with my lee universal decapping die. Prior to bending the pin, no matter how tight I tightened it, it would still push up on some crimped primers. Replaced the pin and it’s still doing it. Now I think I’ve just gorilla tightened it and when it slips next I think I’ll have to replace the whole shot.

  2. Jim Rauls posted in RLP: I know it is not officially recommended to shoot powder coated bullets out of a suppressor. That being said , powder coated are my go to for reloading and I’m gearing up to suppress a lever action 44. Anyone here have any advice for me? How bout a show on loading for suppressor applications?

  3. Joe posted in RLP: How often are you supposed to clean reloading dies for both Rifle and Pistol?

  4. Paul posted in RLP: What ballistic software what do you use? Does it link to your weather meter? If so what weather meter do you use? I am using a Weatherflow weather meter, it is bluetooth compatible I use a tablet instead of a smart phone for my ballistic software.


Cartridge Corner Notes:The .444 Marlin (10.9x57mm) is a rifle cartridge designed in 1964 by Marlin Firearms and Remington Arms. It was designed to fill in a gap left by the older .45-70 when that cartridge was not available in any new lever action rifles; at the time it was the largest lever-action cartridge available.[1] The .444 resembles a lengthened .44 Magnum and provides a significant increase in velocity. It is usually used in the Marlin 444 lever-action rifle.


The history of the cartridge


In the mid-1960s the .45-70 had all but disappeared from the American marketplace. There was no big-bore cartridge available in a lever-action rifle in current production, so Marlin decided to create a new cartridge to fill this empty niche. They created what is essentially an elongated version of the .44 Magnum by making it nearly an inch longer to give it power similar to the .45-70.[3] The case Marlin created is very similar to a rimmed .303 British trimmed and necked-up to work with .429 bullets.[4]


Some hunters initially claimed some trouble because the .444 was frequently hand-loaded using existing .429 bullets that were designed for use at handgun velocities. Remington has stated in letter and email, when asked, that their 240gr .444 bullet was not the same as a .44 magnum handgun bullet.[3] However, diligent end users and DIY ballisticians have conducted detailed tests of projectiles and found that the bullet is identical; indicating that those in contact with Remington, or Remington themselves, spoke in error. The 240grain Remington Soft Point, in both bulk bullet and factory loads, is now reputed to be among to best expanding jacketed bullets for whitetail class game.


Despite the litany of false rumors about the 240 grain bullets, the rifle gained additional popularity as additional bullets were designed for its higher velocity.[5]


In 1972 Marlin re-introduced the .45-70 to their lever-action line, expanding their big-bore offerings.[3] Sales of the .444 are now overshadowed by .45-70 cartridge which has enjoyed a resurgence in popularity due to interest in cowboy action shooting. This quick action and powerful stopping power has been shown to be an efficient and useful hunting rifle for experienced shooters.


The specs are in the show notes if you desire to read them, as well as a link to the article on Wikipedia:


Type Rifle

Place of origin United States

Production history

Designer Marlin, Remington Arms

Designed 1964

Manufacturer Remington

Specifications

Bullet diameter .429 in (10.9 mm)

Neck diameter .453 in (11.5 mm)

Base diameter .4706 in (11.95 mm)

Rim diameter .514 in (13.1 mm)

Rim thickness .063 in (1.6 mm)

Case length 2.225 in (56.5 mm)

Overall length 2.55 in (65 mm)

Rifling twist 1-38" (Microgroove) or 1-20" (Ballard cut)

Primer type large rifle

Ballistic performance

Bullet mass/type Velocity Energy

240 gr (16 g) SP 2,350 ft/s (720 m/s) 2,942 ft⋅lbf (3,989 J)

265 gr (17 g) FP 2,200 ft/s (670 m/s) 2,849 ft⋅lbf (3,863 J)

300 gr (19 g) HP 2,000 ft/s (610 m/s) 2,665 ft⋅lbf (3,613 J)

Test barrel length: 24 in

Source(s): Hornady [1] / Remington [2]


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.444_Marlin



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Reloading Podcast 232 - You spent how much on a funnel

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are answering questions about funnels and marking brass.

  1. Shaun C. emailed from the Land Down Under: I’ve been listening to your podcast for a while now and I’m really enjoying it.

    I’m relatively new to reloading, currently reload for 30-06 and 17 Hornet, and waiting to test out some .223 loads (all for hunting)

    Even though I have achieved some great results with my 30-06 & 17 hornet loads, I still have a bit more faith in factory ammo over my handloads when it comes to sighting in a new rifle.

    Can I have your thoughts/opinions, when buying a new rifle do you load up 20 or so rounds of minimum load and use that to sight in then do some load testing? Or do you prefer to sight in using factory?

    Thanks

  2. Ray posted in Reloading Podcast Group: I’m new to reloading and I am having some trouble. When I’m trying to reload my 7 mag and I seat the bullet I can spin the bullet in the case and push it down into it. I have tried different settings and nothing changes.

  3. Ernie K. posted in Reloading Podcast Group: Is there any good way to mark brass so you know how many times it’s been loaded? Was thinking a light punch on the headstamp.

  4. Greg H. posted in Reloading Podcast Group: I am fed up with the plastic fit nothing funnels. What funnels are you using. I have the standard ol rcbs funnel and their one with all the adaptors. Powders like CFE223 go everywhere with these.

  5. Kent A. posted in The Reloading Room: What’s the best way to get Imperial Sizing Wax off of my cases?

  6. Go no Go Primer gauges

  7. Hardcore Funnels

  8. Area 419 funnels

  9. Satern Barrels Funnels

  10. Mighty Armory

  11. Entirely Crimson

  12. Freedom Seed Brass

  13. Buckeye Targets


Cartridge Corner Notes:45-70 Gov’t The new cartridge was completely identified as the .45-70-405, but was also referred to as the ".45 Government" cartridge in commercial catalogs. The nomenclature of the time was based on three properties of the cartridge:

  • .45: nominal diameter of bullet, measured in decimal inches, i.e., 0.458 inches (11.63 mm);

  • 70: weight of black powder, measured in grains, i.e., 70 grains (4.56 g);

  • 405: weight of lead bullet, measured in grains, i.e., 405 grains (26.2 g).

The minimum acceptable accuracy of the .45-70 from the 1873 Springfield was approximately 4 inches (100 mm) at 100 yards (91 m), however, the heavy, slow-moving bullet had a "rainbow" trajectory, the bullet dropping multiple yards (meters) at ranges greater than a few hundred yards (meters). A skilled shooter, firing at known range, could consistently hit targets that were 6 × 6 feet (1.8 m) at 600 yards (550 m)—the Army standard target. It was a skill valuable mainly in mass or volley fire, since accurate aimed fire on a man-sized target was effective only to about 300 yards (270 m).

After the Sandy Hook tests of 1879, a new variation of the .45-70 cartridge was produced: the .45-70-500, which fired a heavier 500 grain (32.5 g) bullet. The heavier 500-grain (32 g) bullet produced significantly superior ballistics, and could reach ranges of 3,350 yards (3,120 m), which were beyond the maximum range of the .45-70-405. While the effective range of the .45-70 on individual targets was limited to about 1,000 yards (915 m) with either load, the heavier bullet would produce lethal injuries at 3,500 yards (3,200 m). At those ranges, the bullets struck point-first at a roughly 30 degree angle, penetrating three 1-inch (2.5 cm) thick oak boards, and then traveling to a depth of 8 inches (20 cm) into the sand of the Sandy Hook beach. It was hoped the longer range of the .45-70-500 would allow effective volley fire at ranges beyond those normally expected of infantry fire.[5]


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Reloading Podcast 231 - Loads of Bacon

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking with Loads Of Bacon, You Tuber and creator of The Reloader’s Network.

  1. https://thereloadersnetwork.com/

  2. Loads Of Bacon You Tube channel





Cartridge Corner Notes: 22 Varmiter or 22-250 Remington, a wildcat round that went legit. Originally designed in the 1930’s the 22 Varmiter was to be the 220 Swift but the designer Capt. Wotkyn was shot down by Winchester but used the name 220 swift on Winchesters 6MM Navy Case necked down and shortened to 2.20” and Necked down to .224. Wotkyn, not giving up worked with noted handloader, J. Bushnell Smith and Gunsmith Jerry Gebby. Using the Savage .250-3000 case Wotkyn orginaly wanted to use the three of them perfected the 22 Varminter  going so far as to copyright the name. Phil Sharpe noted gun writer and ballistician became involved when Gebby built him a rifle in the cartridge. Sharpe was working with the 220 Swift at that time and noted that the Varmiter was far more flexible than the 220 Swift. The Swift need to be loaded hot to reach it potential, whereas the Varmiter was flexible in loading from 1500 fps to 4500 fps. Plus case stretching was held to a minimum along with throat wear, due to it’s 28 degree shoulder. Barrel life was greater again due to it steep shoulder angle, the 220 Swift was having problems in those days with shot out barrels. His comments that the Varmiter was a perfect balance of primer, bullet neck length, body taper, load density and shoulder angle.

Accuracy was excellent and Phil pronounced it as the most outstanding cartridge development of the past decade. He was looking for it to become a factory cartridge. He had a long wait it wasn’t until 1963 when Browning Firearms brought out the 22-250.  John Amber in the 1964 Gun Digest said that Browning was asking for trouble with the release of the 22-250! ( John Amber was a friend of mine, during the early days of my shooting hobby)

Finally in 1965 Remington made the stepchild a legitimate cartridge. Today it’s not the fastest 22 centerfire or the most accurate but given the amount of ammo that is sold the 22-250 beats the 220 Swift and the 22 PPC in all factory guns.

Reloaders have lots of choices in bullets and powders, little 35 grain pills to 63 grain round nose for factory barrels. Standard loading of a 55 grain bullet will get you to 3600 FPS to 3800 FPS, take it down a notch to a 45 grain load and you will see 4000 FPS. Powders IMR’s 3031, 4895, 4320, 4064, 4350. ( Once saw a handloader dip his 22-250 case in a cup of IMR 4350 filling right to the top of the case then seat his bullet. Hodgden Ball powders Like H-380 named after Bruce Hodgdon’s load of 38.0 grains behind a 55 grain bullet, H414, BLC-2, and his IMR powders.

Limitations of the 22-250 is barrel twist as 63 grain semi pointed bullets are as heavy as you can go, unless you can get a faster twist barrel. Standard twist is 1-14”, a 1-12” or even a 1-10” twist might be better with bullets we have now.

My Loadings have been for Prairie Dogs so I don’t worry too much about twist rate. I shoot mostly 55 grain flat base bullets and 50 grain boat tails. Some 55 grain boat tails are too long for 1-14” twist.

Loads Please note most if not all are over maximum book

WW case       WLR primer shoulder set back .001 in re-sizing

WW760 40.1 grains, 55 grain Hornady spire point   Velocity is 3800 26” barrel

IMR 4320 34.5 grains, 55 grain Sierra Blitz King Velocity 3650     26” barrel

H380 42 grains 50 grain, Hornady plastic tip                         Velocity 4000 fps  26” barrel

Barrel Life

Prairie dog shooting I may go thru 200 to 500 rounds a day most barrels only last me 2 years at this rate.

I don’t shoot these rifles except for hunting and to check sighting in.

I look at barrels as a cost of the hunt so every couple of years a 600 to 800 cost is not bad.  Thanks to Paul Nelson for the information.


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Reloading Podcast 230 - Tirdy Tirdy

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  Tonight the guys are talkin tirty tirdy and some casting.

  1. Chris M. asked: “Mr Fleming, I have a 30-30 question perhaps you could bring up for discussion (if it’s not too much trouble) during a podcast. The question; 30-30 Winchester for a lever action uses a  308 bullet. Could a hand loader use any .308 bullet in that round? For example, I load 168gr ELD’s from Hornady in my .308 loads. Would I be able to use that in a 30-30? Or is it best to just stick with recommended bullet weights for said caliber? I’d love to hear all of your thoughts on this one.”

  2. Brandon posted in CB&BC: So now that hunting season has started or about to start for most, what is everyone’s hunting bullet of choice? My choice this year is the lee 310 gr fn 44 mag at about 10 bhn and moving at about 1,100fps (7.5” barrel) and 1500 fps (20” barrel)Shot from a Ruger Blackhawk hunter and Rossi 92.

  3. Jim posted in CB & BC: I just started researching... Are there any recommendations for resources to cast bullets with something other than lead? I don't mind reading and putting the work in, just wanted to see if there was a recommendation for research. TIA





Cartridge Corner Notes:.30-30 Winchester

The .30-30 Winchester/.30 Winchester Centerfire (7.62×51 mmR) cartridge was first marketed in early 1895 for the Winchester Model 1894 lever-action rifle. The .30-30 (thirty-thirty), as it is most commonly known, was the USA's first small-bore, sporting rifle cartridge designed for smokeless powder.

Characteristics and use

When originally produced by Winchester Repeating Arms (WRA) and Union Metallic Cartridge Company (UMC), it was manufactured with a "metal patched" (jacketed) lead bullet weighing 160 gr. One year later, UMC produced a 170-grain bullet offering, which is still the most popular loading for the cartridge. Both 150- and 170-grain bullets continue to be very popular, as seen in the number of these weights offered by current manufacturers. Although, the 160-grain bullet weight has reappeared in modern cartridges from Hornady, as noted below. Jacketed bullets for the .30-30 are .308 inches in nominal diameter. Cast lead bullets for the .30-30 are also popular and usually are .309 inches in diameter.

The .30-30 is considered to be the "entry-class" for modern big-game hunting cartridges, and it is common to define the characteristics of cartridges with similar ballistics as being in ".30-30 class" when describing their trajectory. While it is very effective on deer-sized and black bear-sized game, most commercial loadings are limited in effective range to about 200 yd (183 m) for that purpose, except when using ballistic-tip ammunition. The cartridge is typically loaded with bullets weighing between 150 and 170 grains (9.7–11.0 g), but lighter loads are possible. Bullets of up to 180 gr (11.7 g) can be used, but the overall length restrictions of the lever-action rifles most commonly chambered for this round limit their usefulness.

In Canada and the U.S., the cartridge has also been used on moose, caribou, and pronghorn. Modern opinions in Canada on its suitability for moose are mixed. Paul Robertson, a Canadian hunting firearms columnist, says, "Too many moose have been taken with the [.30-30] to rule it out as good for this purpose, as well." In both Canada and the U.S. it has a long history of use on moose. It is generally agreed that the .30-30 is not a good choice for hunters who wish to shoot animals at longer ranges. The cartridge, with flat- or round-nosed bullets, does not meet minimum energy standards required for moose hunting in Finland, Norway, or Sweden. Hunting technique and style, as well as law and culture, dictate cartridge choices. Thor Strimbold, a Canadian who has made more than 20 one-shot kills on moose with a .30-30, advises most moose hunters to use more than minimal power if they can handle the recoil. While the .30-30 is legal for hunting moose in Newfoundland, Canada, game authorities do not recommend its use.

One of the primary reasons for the .30-30's popularity amongst deer hunters is its light recoil. Average recoil from a typical 150-grain load at 2,390 feet per second (730 m/s) in a 7.5 lb (3.4 kg) rifle is 10.6 foot-pounds (14.4 J) of felt recoil at the shooter's shoulder, about half that of a comparable rifle chambered for the .30-06 Springfield.


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Reloading Podcast 229 - Powder or bullet

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are answering more questions.

  1. Brandi posted: My boyfriend and I were pondering this last night, so I thought I would ask in The Reloading Room. Let’s say you've chosen a bullet and powder and gone through all the steps in varying charge and seating depth, only to come away with a lot of unimpressive groups. At that point, do you look at changing powder or changing the bullet? I would assume the latter, but I was curious about others' experiences and if putting a different powder under a given bullet could notably improve its performance at similar velocities.

  2. Has anyone loaded a 308 Win load specifically for wolf hunting? What bullet did you choose?

  3. Aaron posted in The Reloading Room: So I'm going to be building a new ar sooner or later the barrel is going to be 18.6” long with 1/8 twist just wondering your thoughts on bullet weight.

  4. Anthony posted in The Reloading Room: For hog hunting in dense timber which do you feel has the most potential and is either significantly more expensive to load for, 45-70 or 20ga sabot? I'm thinking of getting a TC Encore if that helps. Thanks for any help for input.

  5. Alan posted in Reloading Podcast Group: Listening to episode 227 (shotshell) tonight in the truck. Someone asked about the gas cylinder on the Hornady 366 and MEC 9000g presses. It's purpose is to smooth out shell plate rotation, not to control operating speed. I've got a 12ga 366 (1987) and a 2001 20ga 9000g. At high production rates, shot can fly out of the hulls on the 366. Although I haven't run the 9000g fast enough to worry about losing shot out of the hulls, i can see the difference the gas assist makes.

  6. Devin posted in The Reloading Room: My favorite load for my tikka t3 7mm rem mag was 52 grains of imr 4064 under a 150 grain sierra matchking hollow point. I made about 150 rounds! Great groups that touch holes at 100 yards...but my problem is that I just learned that those bullets are not suitable for hunting! I don't know what to do now!





Cartridge Corner Notes:


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Reloading Podcast 228 - intro to shotshell

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking about intro to loading shotshells.

  1. Components

    1. Hull

    2. Wad

    3. Primer

    4. Powder

    5. Payload

  2. process





Cartridge Corner Notes:7 MM Remington Magnum

Based on the 300 H & H Magnum Case the 7MM Mag leaves the basic design of the case head but with reduced taper to the case body and a steeper shoulder. SAAMI and CIP specs differ on Chamber pressure with SAAMI MAP being less at 61,000 PSI and CIP at 62,366 psi, CIP Proof load is almost 78,000 psi (77,958 )

This is a flat shooting round capable  of taking all North American game and Most thin skinned African Game.

Little known to most but the 7mm Magnum is a fine target round if you can take the recoil, in fact the United States Secret Service used the 7MM mag as an Anti Sniper Rifle.

Barrel length should be kept at 24” or above with 26” being preferred (28” is even better).

Twist rate of 1 in 9” being standard but with the new longer match bullets you might want to go with a 1 in 7.5”.

Bullet weights range from 100 grains to 197 grains.

As a Hand loader we can tailor our loads to meet almost any game. For Ground Hogs to Eland, Dik-dik to Brown Bear.

Light weight 100 grain pills at 3800 fps to 197 grain match load at 2825 fps for a 24” barrel. I know of long range match shooters that use the 197 grain load that are getting closer to 3000 fps in 30” barrels.

It is critical that the hand loader resize his case properly, that means he should set the shoulder back between .001” to .003” and check bolt closure to make sure that the action cycles smoothly. A good reloading die for this is a Forester Full length sizing die that has been sent to Forester along with 3 fired cases, They then custom fit the die to the rifle chamber. Seating ,mag length and action configuration all play a part. With a good custom action, barrel and stock you can spend around $2600 to $3500 on a custom rifle that will last you and your family generations.


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Reloading Podcast 227 - Answering Emails

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are answering more questions.

  1. Brooks Thornhill posted in Cast Bullets & Bullet Casting: Question - Why do non-cast projectiles require so much additional propellant in comparison to their cast counterparts of the same weight?

  2. David LaMagna posted in The Reloading Room:  Those who have two rifles in the same cartridge, do you have separate FL dies for each rifle?




Cartridge Corner Notes:270 Winchester

The .270 Winchester is a rifle cartridge developed by Winchester Repeating Arms Company in 1923 and unveiled in 1925 as a chambering for their bolt-action Model 54.[3] The cartridge is a necked down .30-03, which is the same length as the .280 Remington, both of which are longer than the .30-06 Springfield. The .270, .280, and .30-06 were all derived from the .30-03 parent case.

The .270 Winchester became a very popular cartridge due to the widespread praises of gunwriters like Townsend Whelen and Jack O'Connor who used the cartridge for 40 years and touted its merits in the pages of Outdoor Life.[4][5] It drives an 8.4 grams (130 gr) bullet at approximately 960 m/s (3,140 ft/s), later reduced to 930 m/s (3,060 ft/s). The cartridge demonstrated high performance at the time of its introduction and was marketed as being suitable for big game shooting in the 270 to 460 metres (300 to 500 yd) range. Two additional bullet weights were soon introduced: a 6.5 grams (100 gr) hollow-point bullet for varmint shooting, and a 9.7 grams (150 gr) bullet for larger deer, elk, and moose in big-game hunting.[3]

While not an immediate success, over the succeeding decades and especially in the post-World War II period, the .270 Winchester attained great popularity among gun owners, metallic silhouette shooters and hunters, ranking it among the most popular and widely used cartridges worldwide. Internationally, firearms manufacturers now offer this chambering in all firearm varieties: bolt-actions, single-shots, lever-actions (such as the Browning BLR), pump-actions (such as the Remington 7600), autoloaders (such as the Remington 7400), and even a few double rifles.[6]



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Reloading Podcast 226 - Benched

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking about building benches.

  1. Nick Jones posted: A segment on benches would be great for new guys/just starting stage. Build vs buy, what materials work and what doesn’t. Making the most of space or building it big enough for future presses/gear.

  2. https://www.facebook.com/groups/reloadingpodcastgroup/permalink/341813159716706/

  3. https://www.facebook.com/groups/thereloadingroom/permalink/1976806845731321/

  4. https://www.titanreloading.com/lee-reloading-stand

  5. https://inlinefabrication.com/collections/quick-change-press-mounting-system

  6. https://inlinefabrication.com/collections/inline-rail-wall-mount-organization-system

  7. https://inlinefabrication.com/collections/ultramounts

Cartridge corner:


25 - 45 Sharps: The .25-45 Sharps is a firearms cartridge designed by Michael H Blank, then CEO of the Sharps Rifle Company, LLC, as a general hunting cartridge for most North American game, in particular Deer, Antelope, Hogs, and Coyotes. Unlike .300 AAC Blackout which was targeted specifically at the suppressed rifle market, and adapted to hunting, the .25-45 Sharps was designed primarily as a hunting round. That is not to say the round does not have tactical applications as its ballistics exceed that of the 5.56x45mm NATO cartridge. The cartridge name is derived from its caliber (.257) and case length (necked-up 5.56×45), as opposed to older hyphenated cartridges that were named for caliber and powder charge. Factory ballistics with the 87-grain bullet equal those of the original .250-3000 Savage with the same bullet weight.

Parent case .223 Remington

Case type Rimless, Bottlenecked

Bullet diameter .257 in (6.5 mm)

Neck diameter .284 in (7.2 mm)

Shoulder diameter .3539 in (8.99 mm)

Base diameter .376 in (9.6 mm)

Rim diameter .378 in (9.6 mm)

Rim thickness .045 in (1.1 mm)

Case length 1.760 in (44.7 mm)

Overall length 2.260 in (57.4 mm)

Rifling twist 1 in 10 in (250 mm)

Primer type Small rifle







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Reloading Podcast 225 - Dangnabbit You Tube

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are covering lead.

  1. Chris Abbott posted in Cast Bullets & Bullet Casting: Is there a reasonably easy way to turn wheel weight lead into pure lead?

  2. Tim Denton posted a photo of the podcast on a 100" screen. Just got off work and enjoying the podcast on my theater system keep up with the great information. Let me know if you all are ever in the Denver, CO area. Thundrbo1t.




Cartridge Corner Notes:.338 Lapua Magnum:


The .338 Lapua Magnum (8.6×70mm or 8.58×70mm) is a rimless, bottlenecked, centerfire rifle cartridge. It was developed during the 1980s as a high-powered, long-range cartridge for military snipers. It was used in the Afghanistan War and the Iraq War. As a result of this, it became more widely available. The loaded cartridge is 14.93 mm (0.588 in) in diameter (rim) and 93.5 mm (3.68 in) long. It can penetrate better-than-standard military body armour at ranges up to 1,000 metres (1,090 yd) and has a maximum effective range of about 1,750 metres (1,910 yd). Muzzle velocity is dependent on barrel length, seating depth, and powder charge, and varies from 880 to 915 m/s (2,890 to 3,000 ft/s) for commercial loads with 16.2-gram (250 gr) bullets, which corresponds to about 6,525 J (4,813 ft⋅lbf) of muzzle energy.


British military issue overpressure .338 Lapua Magnum cartridges with a 91.4 mm (3.60 in) overall length, loaded with 16.2-gram (250 gr) LockBase B408 very-low-drag bullets fired at 936 m/s (3,071 ft/s) muzzle velocity from a L115A3 Long Range Rifle were used in November 2009 by British sniper Corporal of Horse(CoH) Craig Harrison to establish the then new record for the longest confirmed sniper kill in combat, at a range of 2,475 m (2,707 yd).[4][5]


In addition to its military role, it is increasingly used by hunters and civilian long-range shooting enthusiasts. The .338 Lapua Magnum is capable of taking down any game animal, though its suitability for some dangerous game (Cape buffalo, hippopotamus, white rhinoceros, and elephant) is arguable, unless accompanied by a larger "backup" calibre: "There is a huge difference between calibres that will kill an elephant and those that can be relied upon to stop one."[6] In Namibia the .338 Lapua Magnum is legal for hunting Africa's Big five game if the loads have ≥ 5,400 J (3,983 ft⋅lbf) muzzle energy.[7]


Type

Rifle

Place of origin

Finland

Service history

Used by

Multiple official and civil users



Production history

Designer

Nammo Lapua Oy

Designed

1989

Produced

1989–present

Specifications

Parent case

.416 Rigby, .338/416

Case type

Rimless, bottleneck

Bullet diameter

0.338 in as the name suggests

Neck diameter

0.372 in

Shoulder diameter

0.544 in

Base diameter

0.587 in

Rim diameter

0.588 in

Rim thickness

0.060 in

Case length

2.724 in

Overall length

3.681 in

Case capacity

114.2 gr H2O)

Rifling twist

1-10"

Primer type

Large rifle magnum

Maximum pressure

60,916 psi




Reviews:

Just listened to Episode 223 (mostly about pressure signs) while driving to an out of town pistol match and pulled over to grab gas and type this. A few things to note.

Firstly on the topic of lube in the chamber, the phenomenon is called bolt-thrust. It’s common to see for 2-3 shots after cleaning your bore if residual cleaning liquid is present, in instances of excessive residual case lube, and even with highly mirror-polished chambers. Effectively the brass cannot “grab” the chamber walls and additional force is transmitted to the bolt face (and thus the bolt lugs) by rearward travel of the case. This manifests itself with higher than normal amounts of primer cratering as well as shiny polished flats on the case head.

Onward to the 1911 stuff, and I’m not trying to be a smartass here, but the pressure signs talked about in the show are largely NOT pressure signs.
1.) The link on a 1911 does not stop rearward movement of the barrel. If it does the gun was improperly built and it will surely break (or slidestop pin will break). This force is absorbed by the frame at the Vertical Impact Surface (VIS) upon being struck by the rear portion of the lower barrel lug (or “feet”) after the link has pulled the barrel down. The link serves one purpose: pull the barrel down after .100” or so of joint travel between barrel and slide.
2.) The upper lugs on a 1911 absorb recoil, but “flanging” and peeking of the forward lug surfaces is also a product of improper barrel fit. As the barrel/slide make their rearward journey together, the link tethers the barrel to the frame and the barrel is forced to rotate down in an arc. If this rotating is impeded by a link that is too long (larger radius arc of travel) or the barrel bed and horizontal impact surface of the frame is cut too high, you get rounding and flanging of the upper lugs as they are not fully clearance of the slide lug recesses when the slide continues back in the recoil cycle.
3.) The back of the barrel hood does not impact the breachface upon firing. It is only when the slide returns to battery that the slide impacts the hood and pushes the barrel forward and up on the slidestop pin via the lower lug radius (and sometimes the link hit we’ll save that argument for another day). Upon firing it’s quite the opposite, the barrel hood and slide are actively being pushed apart by the recoil forces imparted on the breachface (ala bolt face in podcast) and that is impeded by the forward edges of the upper lugs. This isn’t a pressure issue, it’s again a fitting issue. If there is fore-aft slop between #1 lug (front of chamber area) and the breachface, sufficient thrust may be present to cause some peening or cracking but that’s extremely rare. After the first couple hundred or thousand rounds generally all this stretching is done and the slide picks up contact with the #2 lug if it didn’t have any at the start.

The reason I said all that is that the 1911, when built properly, can and has been subject to a steady diet of 55k psi factory loads via the 9x23 Winchester, along with IPSC 38 Super and 9mm Major loads far exceeding 40k. The latter do it with the help of a compensator that delays unlocking by thrusting the muzzle down, thus allowing chamber pressures to drop, and the former does it with a big spring and uber-thick mainwebbed brass. There are guns out there with round counts in the hundreds of thousands shooting such loads.

Cheers,
Kyle


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Reloading Podcast 224 - My plunk won't plunk...

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are answering more questions.

  1. Rick posted: Hi all, novice question - I’m attempting to load 9mm rounds for my PCC, but nothing seems to pass plunk test. Using new frontier barrel, upper and lower. I know pistol caliber carbines are picky, but none of my coated and plated bullets will plunk in the barrel at different OAL’s. It will take commercial Aquila 124g RN with an OAL of 1.13 however. So my question is what are some thinner profile 9mm bullets out there for reloading? Anything I might be missing?

  2. Joshua posted: Looking for Advice on .45 ACP. I have read a couple of different opinions about crimping. Some opinions I have read say, “I have to Taper crimp”, and others tell me “Crimp doesn’t really matter so long as it works it works.” I am hoping all of you fine folks can enlighten me. I have been reloading rifle cartridges for awhile now, but I am brand new to pistol calibers. Seems like pistols have the potential to be simple. Should also mention that I am reloading for a 1911. Thanks in advance!

  3. Maverick posted: Yes brass prep sucks. Make sure y’all are careful when deburring and chamfering brass I slipped and my finger is now gushing.

  4. Miguel posted: Hey Folks -  Need some recommendations – I am getting ready to reload some 223 brass for my AR – was wondering – what DIE SET you all recommend? I have a single stage RCBS press.

Cartridge corner: .243 Win



Parent case

.308 Winchester

Bullet diameter

.243 in (6.2 mm)

Neck diameter

.276 in (7.0 mm)

Shoulder diameter

.454 in (11.5 mm)

Base diameter

.471 in (12.0 mm)

Rim diameter

.473 in (12.0 mm)

Case length

2.045 in (51.9 mm)

Overall length

2.7098 in (68.83 mm)

Case capacity

52 or 53[1] to 54.8gr H2O[2]

Rifling twist

1-10 to 1-8

Primer type

Large Rifle

Maximum pressure (SAAMI)

60,000 psi (410 MPa)









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Reloading Podcast 223 - pop goes the brass

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are discussing over pressure signs.

  1. Over pressure discussion: (Indications of, signs, things to watch out for)
    Discussed at length, all the rest of the questions can be used for next week’s notes.

Cartridge Corner Notes:

The .38-40 Winchester is actually a .40 caliber cartridge shooting .401 caliber bullets. The cartridge was introduced by Winchester in 1874 and is derived from their .44-40 Winchester. This cartridge was introduced for rifles, but in its reintroduction for Cowboy Action Shooting it has seen some popularity as a pistol cartridge. It is not particularly well suited to hunting larger game, but it was popular when it was introduced, along with the previous .44-40 Winchester, for deer hunting. It can be used successfully on smaller game animals, and for self-defense. Current loadings are intended for revolvers.


It is unclear why this cartridge was introduced as it is very similar to the .44-40 from which it was derived. It has approximately 110 ft⋅lbf (150 J) less muzzle energy, and has a muzzle velocity about 110 ft/s (34 m/s) less than the .44-40. The bullet differs by only .026 inches in bullet diameter and 20 grains (1.3 g) in standard bullet weight from the original .44-40. The goal may have been to reduce recoil while maintaining a similar bullet sectional density. One unusual design element of this cartridge is that factory ammunition was loaded with a different case profile than the standard chamber for this cartridge, factory ammunition having a much longer neck than the standard chamber. Most reloading dies are designed to size fired brass to the chamber specification rather than that of the original factory ammunition case profile.


The renewed interest in this caliber can be explained by the increasing popularity of cowboy action shooting  and metallic silhouette shooting. Several single-action revolvers have recently been chambered for this cartridge, including the Ruger Vaquero. Most modern reloading data for this cartridge is found in the handgun section of reloading manuals.


This information was extracted from this Wikipedia Page:


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.38-40_Winchester

Personally I have had a wee small bit of experience shooting it, but I don’t  own the revolver that I was shooting. I’d say it has a lot more “spit and vinegar” than the mere 357 Magnum Cartridge. (Said tongue in cheek, of course.” But that’s as it should be, it’s a good deal larger than the 357 Case.

Cartridge Specs:
Type   Pistol

Place of origin United States

.

Production history

.

Designer           Winchester Repeating Arms Company

Produced          1874 to 1937, now in production again.

.

Specifications

.

Parent case                .44-40 Winchester

Case type                   rimmed, bottlenecked

Bullet diameter              .401 in (10.2 mm)

Neck diameter               .416 in (10.6 mm)

Shoulder diameter         .4543 in (11.54 mm)

Base diameter           .465 in (11.8 mm)

Rim diameter             .520 in (13.2 mm)

Rim thickness           .058 in (1.5 mm)

Case length                1.30 in (33 mm)

Overall length           1.59 in (40 mm)

Ballistic performance

Bullet mass/type            Velocity            Energy

180 gr (12 g) SP              1,160 ft/s (350 m/s)      538 ft⋅lbf (729 J)







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Reloading Podcast 222 - No Dummy, your finger doesn't belong there

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking about the Bob, some questions about consistency.

Cartridge corner: .257 Roberts Cartridge


.257 Roberts

Type Rifle

Place of origin United States

Production history

Designer Ned Roberts

Designed 1920s

Manufacturer Remington Arms

Produced 1934-Present

Variants .257 Roberts (+P), .257 Roberts Ackley Improved

Specifications

Parent case 7×57mm Mauser

Case type rimless bottlenecked

Bullet diameter .257 in (6.5 mm)

Neck diameter .290 in (7.4 mm)

Shoulder diameter .430 in (10.9 mm)

Base diameter .472 in (12.0 mm)

Rim diameter .473 in (12.0 mm)

Case length 2.233 in (56.7 mm)

Overall length 2.775 in (70.5 mm)

Rifling twist 1-10"

Primer type large rifle

Ballistic performance

Bullet mass/type Velocity Energy

75 gr (5 g) HP 3,450 ft/s (1,050 m/s) 1,983 ft⋅lbf (2,689 J)

100 gr (6 g) B-TIP 3,020 ft/s (920 m/s) 2,025 ft⋅lbf (2,746 J)

117 gr (8 g) SPBT 2,840 ft/s (870 m/s) 2,096 ft⋅lbf (2,842 J)

Test barrel length: 24

Source(s): Accurate Powders [1]


The .257 Roberts also known as .257 Bob [2] is a medium-powered .25 caliber cartridge. It has been described as the best compromise between the low recoil and flat trajectory of smaller calibers such as the .22 and 6mm, and the strong energy but not the strong recoil of larger popular hunting calibers, such as the 7mm family and the popular .30-06.[3]


Many cartridge designers in the 1920s were creating various .25 caliber cartridges. Because of its size, the 7×57mm Mauser case was a common choice, having near the ideal volume capacity for the "quarter-bore" (called this because the .25 caliber is one quarter of an inch) using powders available at that time. Ned Roberts is usually credited with being the designer for this cartridge idea. Eventually in 1934 Remington Arms chose to introduce their own commercial version of such a cartridge, and although it wasn't the exact dimensions of the wildcat made by Roberts, they called it the .257 Roberts.[4]


From its introduction until the appearance of more popular 6 mm cartridges such as .243 Winchester and 6mm Remington, it was a very popular general purpose cartridge.[5] Today, although overshadowed by other cartridges, it lives on with bolt-action rifles being available from some major manufacturers.


https://www.ballisticstudies.com/Knowledgebase/.257+Roberts.html



  1. My story of how to be a Dumbass. By Rusty S.

    1- Get up pour coffee and sit down to reload.
    2- Make sure dies are correctly adjusted
    3- Load freshly prepped 30-06 case in RCBS press.
    4- Make sure dies are correctly adjusted again.
    5- With left hand pointer finger reach up into underside of die to make sure decapping pin is correctly adjusted.
    6- Simultaneously with right hand pull down on ram lever running a nice shiny case into left hand pointer finger; cutting a perfect half moon into the finger!

    My suggestion is NOT to do this…

  2. Jason Posted:
    During the cartridge sizing phase I’m noticing some inconsistencies with the results. After each pull on a 30+ year old RCBS manual loader my sizes vary from .001 to .006 from the desired length. I can never seem to get the length to be consistent after each throw. This is happening with both pistol and rifle, old and new dies. After a decade of having these same results I can say I’ve never had an issue at the range or cartridge feeding. -- So, is this normal for a manual loader? Should I have any concerns or is this acceptable and others see the same results?

  3. Derrick posted:
    What is your starting load for 250 gr Keith style SWC using Alliant 2400? Alliant calls for 20 grains and if I deduct 10% as a starting load that would be 18 grains. Seems a little hot to me for cast…

  4. Raymond posted:
    I was wondering if anyone knows how to figure out my proper bullet seating depth for my bolt gun .308 win? I know what my book says for COL, but I've heard of people figuring out a way that is rifle specific?







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Reloading Podcast 221 - you shot what out of a 3006

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys have Matt from Geeks, Gadgets and Guns talking Sabots.


Cartridge corner: 50 Browning Machine Gun aka 50 BMG

The .50 Browning Machine Gun (.50 BMG, 12.7×99mm NATO and designated as the 50 Browning by the C.I.P.) is a cartridge developed for the Browning .50 caliber machine gun in the late 1910s. Entering service officially in 1921, the round is thought by some to be based on a greatly scaled-up .30-06 cartridge although other influences also seem to have come into play. Under STANAG 4383, it is a standard cartridge for NATO forces as well as many non-NATO countries. The cartridge itself has been made in many variants: multiple generations of regular ball, tracer, armor-piercing (AP), incendiary, and saboted sub-caliber rounds. The rounds intended for machine guns are made into a continuous belt using metallic links.

The .50 BMG cartridge is also used in long-range target and anti-materiel rifles, as well as other .50-caliber machine guns.

A wide variety of ammunition is available, and the availability of match grade ammunition has increased the usefulness of .50 caliber rifles by allowing more accurate fire than lower quality rounds.[3]

There are several different types of ammunition used in the M2HB and AN aircraft guns. From World War II through the Vietnam War, the big Browning was used with standard ball, armor-piercing (AP), armor-piercing incendiary (API), and armor-piercing incendiary tracer (APIT) rounds. All .50 ammunition designated "armor-piercing" was required to completely perforate 0.875 inches (22.2 mm) of hardened steel armor plate at a distance of 100 yards (91 m) and 0.75 inches (19 mm) at 547 yards (500 m).[32] The API and APIT rounds left a flash, report, and smoke on contact, useful in detecting strikes on enemy targets; they were primarily intended to incapacitate thin-skinned and lightly armored vehicles and aircraft, while igniting their fuel tanks.

Current ammunition types include M33 Ball (706.7 grain) for personnel and light material targets, M17 tracer, M8 API (622.5 grain), M20 API-T (619 grain), and M962 SLAP-T. The latter ammunition along with the M903 SLAP (Saboted Light Armor Penetrator) round can perforate 1.34 inches (34 mm) of FHA (face-hardened steel plate) at 500 metres (550 yd), 0.91 inches (23 mm) at 1,200 metres (1,300 yd), and 0.75 inches (19 mm) at 1,500 metres (1,600 yd). This is achieved by using a 0.30-inch-diameter (7.6 mm) tungsten penetrator. The SLAP-T adds a tracer charge to the base of the ammunition. This ammunition was type classified in 1993

  1. Jeffrey Goodness posted
    For loading 9mm, what's your favorite powder, what's your favorite bullet????

  2. Sabots https://www.eabco.net/Accelerator-Type-Sabots-for-30-Caliber-Cartridges-100_p_13645.html  Or http://www.sabotreloadingpro.com/
    Lfd research link needed GGG link also

  3. Freedom seed brass 10% “reloading”

  4. Entirely Crimson 10% “reloading”

  5. Buckeye Targets 10% “reloading”







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Reloading Podcast 220 - Ever got your nipple stuck

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are answering more questions.

Cartridge Corner:The .357 S&W Magnum (9×33mmR), or simply .357 Magnum, is a revolver cartridge with a .357-inch (9.07 mm) bullet diameter. It was created by Elmer Keith, Phillip B. Sharpe, and D. B. Wesson of firearms manufacturers Smith & Wesson and Winchester.

It is based upon Smith & Wesson's earlier .38 Special cartridge. The .357 Magnum cartridge was introduced in 1934, and its use has since become widespread. This cartridge started the "Magnum era" of handgun ammunition.

The .357 Magnum cartridge is notable for its highly effective terminal ballistics when used for hunting or defense. Designer Elmer Keith, Phillip B. Sharpe

Designed 1934 Introduced 1935

Specs:

Parent case .38 Special

Case type Rimmed (R), straight

Bullet diameter .357 in (9.1 mm)

Neck diameter .379 in (9.6 mm)

Base diameter .379 in (9.6 mm)

Rim diameter .440 in (11.2 mm)

Rim thickness .060 in (1.5 mm)

Case length 1.29 in (33 mm)

Overall length 1.59 in (40 mm)

Case capacity 26.2 gr H2O (1.70 cm3)

Primer type Small Pistol Magnum

Maximum pressure 35,000 psi (241 MPa)[1][2]

Ballistic performance

Bullet mass/type Velocity Energy

125 gr (8 g) JHP Federal 1,450 ft/s (440 m/s) 583 ft⋅lbf (790 J)

158 gr (10 g) JHP Federal 1,240 ft/s (380 m/s) 539 ft⋅lbf (731 J)

Test barrel length: 4 in (102 mm) (vented)

Source(s): Federal,[3]

  1. Robert Brewer posted;  Who's load data do you use for load development? Bullet manufacturer, Powder manufacturer, or other reloading manual. It seems like Hodgdon’s data is always much higher than the bullet manufacturers.  And he posted again: “Is it common to see a drop in velocity as you move closer to the lands when adjusting seating depth?”

  2. Roger A Buettner posted;  Enjoy listening to the show. I listen at work after the bosses go home. Please remember that some of us work 2nd shift and can’t watch live. (Big Shout OUT to Roger!)






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Reloading Podcast 219 - You want to use what bullet

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are covering more questions about loads and bullets.

  1. I had a request from a listener about the ammo/storage crates that I made up a long time ago… Photos are at the bottom of this document. If you want to bother uploading them. I’ve already sent him these images.

  2. Vinos posted in The Reloading Room: Could I use 125 grain 357 projectiles to load into 9mm casings and fire reliably?

  3. Jack Lucia posted in The Reloading Room: What's a good powder and bullet combination for 7mm-08 for deer?

  4. Jon Cummins posted in The Reloading Room: So my lgs has a good deal on some of the Hornady .452 225gr bullets would it be a bad idea to try and load those for 45acp too?





Reviews:

Author: Maverick546890

Rating: ⭐⭐⭐⭐⭐

Title: Great Podcast

Review: Went from loading rifle powder in a pistol case (never again) 6.5 years ago. To just hitting a million 5.56 rounds loaded, I would say that the knowledge I have gained from this podcast has helped me advance way faster in reloading.



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Reloading Podcast 218 - Did you write that down

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are talking recordkeeping.

  1. Tim Talbot posted:

    Record keeping is something that I often don't do like I should. Most of the time, the only record I have of a load is the label I put on on the box, which is the one record keeping issue I'm actually good about. How many of you use commercially printed notebooks? How many use sheets printed from an online source? Have you laid out something yourself? Care to share your layout?


Mike I’d like to add a couple links here of info that I’ve created that folks can print for themselves:

This one is for the Shooters Data Book:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1Z_v6GqzUtUJyVuM2OSZruqH8DYcNklYdqmOjWSKTOLw/edit?usp=sharing

 

This one ^^^^ is public to anyone with the link:
 

  1. https://www.armorally.com/brass-counts-by-weight/

    A listing of brass by the pound...

     

  2. Jacob from Reloading Podcast Group - Here’s a conundrum. It’s been rolling around in my brain. I have a sporter weight 7 Remington magnum. I upgraded the rifle through sales and falling prices in 2015. It’s a balanced rifle and handles super well until it goes off and rattles the shooter with a long recoil impulse and large report. I have shot one group with it that i am proud of as well as the highest scoring whitetail I’ll likely ever shoot. Here’s where reloading comes in. I’d like to load it to a lesser recoiling load but I’m aware that if the powder capacity is loaded to much less than 90% than accuracy suffers. So on one hand I struggle to be accurate with full power loads because of recoil, and then lower power loads are less accurate by nature in this big case. Any experience and thoughts are welcome.


 

  1. Gerrid from Reloading Podcast Group - Ok call me a luddite if you want but I've had it with my digital scale. Back to the the trusty 5-0-5. It may be slower but when your double weighing each charge because you've lost confidence, is it really? What scales are you guys using that you trust?

 

https://www.amazon.com/WAOAW-Milligram-Reloading-Calibration-Batteries/dp/B06W5VXN53/ref=sr_1_1?s=storageorganization&ie=UTF8&qid=1534901333&sr=8-1&keywords=waoaw






 

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Reloading Podcast 216 - 40 short and weak

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are finishing up the dillon 550 set up.

  1. .40 S&W (10×22mm Smith & Wesson in unofficial metric notation) is a rimless pistol cartridge developed jointly by major American firearms manufacturers Smith & Wesson and Winchester.[3] The .40 S&W was developed from the ground up as a law enforcement cartridge designed to duplicate performance of the Federal Bureau of Investigation's (FBI) reduced-velocity 10mm Auto cartridge which could be retrofitted into medium-frame (9mm size) semi-automatic handguns. It uses 0.40-inch (10 mm) diameter bullets ranging in weight from 105 to 200 grains (6.8 to 13.0 g).  
    In the aftermath of the 1986 FBI Miami shootout, in which two FBI special agents were killed and five wounded, the FBI started the process of testing 9×19mm Parabellum and .45 ACP ammunition in preparation to replace its standard-issue revolver with a semi-automatic pistol. The semi-automatic pistol offered two advantages over the revolver: 1) increased ammunition capacity and 2) increased ease of reloading during a firefight. The FBI was satisfied with the performance of its .38 Special +P 158 gr (10.2 g) L.S.W.C.H.P. (lead semi-wadcutter hollow point) cartridge ("FBI Load") based on decades of dependable performance. Ammunition for the new semi-automatic pistol had to deliver terminal performance equal or superior to the .38 Special FBI Load. The FBI developed a series of practically oriented tests involving eight test events that they believed reasonably represented the kinds of situations that FBI agents commonly encounter in shooting incidents.[citation needed]
    During tests of the 9×19mm and .45 ACP ammunition, the FBI Firearms Training Unit's Special Agent-in-Charge John Hall decided to include tests of the 10mm cartridge, supplying his personally owned Colt Delta Elite 10mm semi-automatic, and personally handloaded ammunition. The FBI's tests revealed that a 170–180 gr (11.0–11.7 g) JHP 10mm bullet, propelled between 900–1,000 ft/s (270–300 m/s), achieved desired terminal performance without the heavy recoil associated with conventional 10mm ammunition (1,300–1,400 ft/s (400–430 m/s)). The FBI contacted Smith & Wesson and requested it to design a handgun to FBI specifications, based on the existing large-frame S&W Model 4506 .45 ACP handgun, that would reliably function with the FBI's reduced-velocity 10mm ammunition. During this collaboration with the FBI, S&W realized that downsizing the
    10mm full power to meet the FBI medium velocity specification meant less powder and more airspace in the case. They found that by removing the airspace they could shorten the 10mm case enough to fit within their medium-frame 9mm handguns and load it with a 180 gr (11.7 g) JHP bullet to produce ballistic performance identical to the FBI's reduced-velocity 10mm cartridge. S&W then teamed with Winchester to produce a new cartridge, the .40 S&W. It uses a small pistol primer whereas the 10mm cartridge uses a large pistol primer.
    The .40 S&W cartridge debuted January 17, 1990, along with the new Smith & Wesson Model 4006 pistol, although it was several months before the pistols were available for purchase. Austrian manufacturer Glock Ges.m.b.H. beat Smith & Wesson to the dealer shelves in 1990, with pistols chambered in .40 S&W (the Glock 22 and Glock 23) which were announced a week before the 4006.[5] Glock's rapid introduction was aided by its engineering of a pistol chambered in 10mm Auto, the Glock 20, only a short time earlier. Since the .40 S&W uses the same bore diameter and case head as the 10mm Auto, it was merely a matter of adapting the 10mm design to the shorter 9×19mm Parabellum frames. The new guns and ammunition were an immediate success,[6][7] and pistols in the new caliber were adopted by several law enforcement agencies around the nation, including the FBI, which adopted the Glock pistol in .40 S&W in May 1997.

     

  2. Setting up the powder drop and case flare for the 550. Mike will continue his video tutorial on the proper set up of powder drop and case flare for the dillon 550 which should also help others with different brand presses get the right idea of how to adjust their set up.







 

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Reloading Podcast 215 - Dillon 550 as a single stage

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  Tonight the guys are talking pistol and using a 550 as a single stage.

Setting up a Dillon 550 as a single stage style use.



 

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Reloading Podcast 214 - Do you like my hourglass figure

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  Tonight the guys are talking about pistol cartridge reloading issues.

  1. Hoping to get some feedback on my first completed cartridge. The ever so slight hourglass shape worries me, as well as the crimp. I feel like it may be slightly overdone. OAL is 1.092 and I'm using Hornady 115gr fmj bullets. I just got all of my gear in a few hours ago so I am 100% brand new and any advice/criticism is welcome.

37830002_1559710044141040_7029069289663496192_o.jpg

 






 

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Reloading Podcast 213 - Debut of the Cartridge Corner

Hello, and welcome to the Reloading Podcast here on the Firearms Radio Network.  

Tonight the guys are starting the cartridge corner.

  1. Cartridge Corner: .30-06
    Hello reloading podcast,
    I don’t remember if this was asked before.
    I am planning to reload 308 for a bolt action.
    For trimmers that reference the shoulder, do I trim before or after bumping the shoulder?  I think afterwards would makes the most sense, or is this method of trimming not recommended with shoulder bumping?
    Also, do I trim before or after setting neck tension? Can trimming noticeably affect the neck tension after it has been set?
    Thanks,
    Winfred



 

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